Pearsons Funeral Home
Pearsons Funeral Home
149 Breckenridge Ln
LouisvilleKY 40207
 (502) 896-0349

How to Talk to People Who Are Grieving

How to Talk to People Who Are Grieving

Most of us want to be helpful when grief strikes a friend or loved one, but often we don’t know what to say to ease their suffering. If you're at a loss for words, there's guidance available. There's a hopelessness that we feel when someone we love is grieving since nothing we say can help bring back the life that was lost. Moving forward takes time and supporting a loved one during their grief can be difficult. The following information will assist you in comforting a loved one during their mourning period:

What Not to Say to Someone Who is Grieving

"They're in a better place" may be true from your spiritual perspective, but grief experts say that these well-intentioned words are often the least helpful for grieving parties to hear. For the person suffering from grief, any attempt to "make light" of the situation will be less likely to encourage healing and more likely to cause anger. They don't want their loved one in a better place; they want them back. Similarly, offensive sentiments are "I'm glad you were prepared," "At least they didn't suffer," or "You'll find someone new." There's often no "bright side" to death and suggesting that someone's death was a good thing doesn't take away the pain of losing someone. Instead, it makes them feel more alone than ever.

"I'm sorry" sounds so simple but if there's one phrase that passes your lips, this should be the one. Acknowledging the pain they're in is also helpful.

What to Say to Someone Who is Grieving

"I'm sorry" sounds so simple but if there's one phrase that passes your lips, this should be the one. Acknowledging the pain they're in is also helpful. "This must be awful for you," feels a bit obvious and redundant, but sometimes just recognizing your helplessness helps a grieving family member feel less alone. Death and grief are the only things every human is helpless to avoid. 

The Best Way to Support a Grieving Friend

Many widows and widowers report that after the funeral when everyone around them has adjusted to the death, they feel more alone than ever. It's difficult to know what to say, and no one wants to prolong someone's suffering by assuming that they need to talk about it, especially when they're at a loss for words. Some people will want to talk about their grief and others won't, but the most important thing a friend can do is to continue to offer companionship, a safe place to process the feelings they're having and regular contact so that life doesn't feel so lonely. When children are grieving, they specifically need assurances that hopeful things are coming in the future.

To learn more about helping a loved one cope with loss, please contact us at Pearson Funeral Home or visit our Grief & Healing page on our website.

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